Posted by: Ed Darrell | May 4, 2010

When was the Baby Boom?

What is a  baby boom?

The term “baby boom” most often refers to the dramatic post-World War II baby boom (1946-1964). There are an estimated 78.3 million Americans who were born during this demographic boom in births.[1] The term is a general demographic one and is also applicable to other similar population expansions.

Okay, but capitalize it:  When was the Baby Boom, and what was it?

The term “baby boom” most often refers to the dramatic post-World War II baby boom (1946-1964). There are an estimated 78.3 million Americans who were born during this demographic boom in births.[1] The term is a general demographic one and is also applicable to other similar population expansions.

After World War II, soldiers returning from fighting the war held what is euphemistically called “pent up demand.”  The “Baby Boom” was the result.  Soldiers got home and resumed building families where they had left off, or started building families since the war was over and they could turn their attention to “domestic affairs.”  A look at the population charts shows why it was considered a “boom”:

U.S. Birth Rates, 1909-2004; note the Baby Boom

United States birth rate (births per 1000 population). The United States Census Bureau defines the demographic birth boom as between 1946 and 1964 (blue).

So, generally, a member of the Baby Boom Generation, a Boomer, was born no earlier than 1946, and no later than 1964 — from Truman to LBJ’s election.

Many of them contributed to the rise of Rock ‘n Roll (1950s), and they lived through the Cold War (1946-1992) . . .

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