Posted by: Ed Darrell | September 6, 2010

Labor Day – A day to fly the flag

Free Labor Will Win, poster from 1942, (Library of Congress)

Poster from the Office of War Information, 1942

It’s Labor Day 2010 in the United States, a federal holiday, and one of those days Americans are urged to fly the U.S. flag.

The poster was issued by the Office of War Information in 1942, in full color. A black-and-white version at the Library of Congress provides a few details:

Labor Day poster. Labor Day poster distributed to war plants and labor organizations. The original is twenty-eight and one-half inches by forty inches and is printed in full color. It was designed by the Office of War Information (OWI) from a photograph especially arranged by Anton Bruehl, well-known photographer. Copies may be obtained by writing the Distribution Section, Office of War Information

Post borrowed with permission from Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub.

More from Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub:

More from other sites:

Song music cover, "Look for the union label," 1900s

Union Label poster from the AF of L, early 1900s. Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University. Copyright Labor Arts Inc. (here under Fair Use for education)

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Responses

  1. Hey Mr. Darell just checked out the website, and read the article. See ya in class!!

  2. That Labor Day poster at the top is pretty darn interesting, Mr. Darrell!!

  3. Hey Mr. Darell just checked out the website, and read the article. See ya in class!!

  4. how was labor day even started


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