Posted by: Ed Darrell | March 2, 2011

Texas Independence Day’s 175th anniversary, March 2, 2011

Texans writing the Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836

In a meeting hall at Washington-on-the-Brazos, Texans meet to write the Texas Declaration of Independence, released March 2, 1836; image from Portal to Texas History

So, put some barbecue in the smoker, get a glass of iced tea for you and your pet armadillo, sit back and enjoy the holiday. If you’re near Washington-on-the-Brazos, go to the ceremony.  Make sure you’re not out of Blue Bell Ice Cream.

What? You don’t get the day off? You know, Texas schools don’t even take the day off any more.

I thought things were going to change when the Tea Party got to Austin and Washington? What happened?

 

Original Manuscript, Texas Declaration of Independence - Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Original Manuscript, Texas Declaration of Independence - Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Text from the image above:

The Unanimous
Declaration of Independence
made by the
Delegates of the People of Texas
in General Convention
at the Town of Washington
on the 2nd day of March 1836

When a government has ceased
to protect the lives, liberty and property
of the people, from whom its legitimate
powers are derived, and for the advance-
ment of whose happiness it was inst-
ituted, and so far from being a guaran-
tee for the enjoyment of those inesti-
mable and inalienable rights, becomes
an instrument in the hands of evil
rulers for their oppression.

[Complete text, and images of each page, at the Texas State Library and Archives Commission site.]

Resources for Texas Independence Day

Resources at Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub

[Mostly borrowed, with express permission, from Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub.]

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Responses

  1. If it wasnt for this would we still be art of Mexico??

  2. I mean part* lol

  3. There is always the possibility that the U.S. would have taken Texas away from Mexico in the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) — but one of the principal causes of that war was the border dispute about where Texas’s southern border is.

    Basically, though, you’ve got it: But for Texas independence, Texas, and maybe the southwest all the way including California, would still be part of Mexico.

    Strange Maps recently ran a map that shows what that would look like:

    Absolut Vodka ad showing Mexico with California and Texas, still


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